Things Fall Apart Heart Of Darkness Essay

Things Fall Apart Heart Of Darkness Essay-84
His depiction of the highly civilized cultures and traditions of the Igbo nation were a reply to Conrad's ignorant (but well meaning? (For more on this, like the Achebe essay and commentary on it, see the links section below.)Many critics see Things Fall Apart as a book with two narrators, one that adheres to tradition, and another with more modern views.In his essay, Wright plays off Neil Mc Ewan's idea of the two narrative voices: the traditional/communal which dominates the first 2/3 of the book, and the individual/ modern which takes over the last third He claims that Okonkwo's stubborn resistance and deep need to wipe out his father's memory "…are out of harmony with a society which is renowned for its talent for social compromise and which judges a man according to his own worth , not that of his father." (Wright, 78) Okonkwo resists change so much that he can't even accept it in others.

His depiction of the highly civilized cultures and traditions of the Igbo nation were a reply to Conrad's ignorant (but well meaning? (For more on this, like the Achebe essay and commentary on it, see the links section below.)Many critics see Things Fall Apart as a book with two narrators, one that adheres to tradition, and another with more modern views.In his essay, Wright plays off Neil Mc Ewan's idea of the two narrative voices: the traditional/communal which dominates the first 2/3 of the book, and the individual/ modern which takes over the last third He claims that Okonkwo's stubborn resistance and deep need to wipe out his father's memory "…are out of harmony with a society which is renowned for its talent for social compromise and which judges a man according to his own worth , not that of his father." (Wright, 78) Okonkwo resists change so much that he can't even accept it in others.

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In that scene, he is following his own stubborn will, and not tradition.

He kills Ikemefuma not because the system is flawed, but because he does not want to appear weak like his father.

One of the requirements of "civilization" is that a nation must have a history. Gikanki suggest that the beginning of Things Fall Apart is an "imaginary response to the problems of genealogy and cultural identity that have haunted igbo culture…" (Gikanki, 29) The book sets up Okonkwo as surrogate founding father, with the story about throwing the Cat in a wrestling tournament, and other aspects of Okonkwo's history as the same as those of the Umofian nation.

This is possible because he seems to draw his identity from the traditions and laws of Umofia.

It is when he is separated from these values and sent to his mother's land that marks the end of his way of life.

"In general terms, Okonkwo acquires his heroic and tragic status by becoming alienated from the very values he espouses and uses to engender himself." (Gikanki, 39)Okonkwo's tragic flaws Umofia is a nation that definitely treasures loquacity.Wright claims this is a phrase used in "this particular African society" to describe someone like a tragic hero, "…who is most unlike his community but who, through his great strength and his ability to do more than it has ever asked of him, and set examples it does not require, belatedly becomes its representative"(Wright, 79). While he certainly fits the other qualifications of a "great man," Okonkwo only seems to be unlike the community at the end, once everyone has adapted and changed.So how is Okonkwo related to the end of traditional Umofian society?And as for his strict adherence to tradition, that is not quite true.Sure, he does follow the order to kill Ikemefuma-even when he is given a loophole to escape through, pointed out by Obierika-but he also disrupts the Week of Peace and Achebe writes that "… Okonkwo was not the man to stop beating somebody half-way through, not even for fear of a goddess" (Things Fall Apart, 30).But just as the title predicts, Okonkwo's plans for a perfect life go astray.Change is inevitable, and even the best laid plans go astray.But not everyone sees the book as narrated by two distinct voices.It can also be seen as having a single narrator, whose tone changes and adapts over time.In a setting like this, Okonkwo's stammer is a tragic flaw.It is not seen in the book much; never does Achebe quote a passage when Okonkwo sputters out his words.

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