Anna Quindlen Newsweek Essays

Anna Quindlen Newsweek Essays-9
Quindlen is at her best writing about motherhood, feminism and social justice issues, though the latter can sound like the outrage or rant of the week.I'm not sure I liked the organization around loose themes.

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She has exceptionally thought out and articulate ideas about everything from politicians, hunger in America, homelessness, motherhood, race, war, gun control and the oil crisis. Each chapter it seemed was a 4-5 page editorial on different issues facing our nation.

The book made me think about things that we often don't want to think about, let alone talk about because we think it can't really be happening. Many swept under the rug in attempt to make them disappear. Although I did not agree with all her ideas I felt she kept a fairly neutral stance on many of the issues and just laid some of the facts out for the reader to sort through. I picked this up because I enjoyed Quindlen's novel "One True Thing" so much and assumed that my appreciation for her writing style would easily transfer to this collection of articles.

She says too that The great issues are the same as they were when 15 year old Anne Frank ...

wrote in her shabby plaid diary...." Seems change is hard to come by.

I do enjoy Quindlen's writing -- both commentary and fiction -- but while some of her commentary from the late 1990s and early 2000s were still on point, others were so dated that I returned this to the library after only 2 CD's worth because there is so much more to be read. You know how it goes -- nothing in a couple weeks, then I'm #1 on the list for a bunch and leave the library barely able to haul my library tote bag. Library, I do enjoy Quindlen's writing -- both commentary and fiction -- but while some of her commentary from the late 1990s and early 2000s were still on point, others were so dated that I returned this to the library after only 2 CD's worth because there is so much more to be read. You know how it goes -- nothing in a couple weeks, then I'm #1 on the list for a bunch and leave the library barely able to haul my library tote bag. Library, choir #1, choir #2, little music group (this is actually 3 tote bags because of sound system), gym, P. It was interesting to hear her views on various things, but I found her tone to be offensively flippant at times and thought that she occasionally oversimplified weighty issues that should probably not be the topic of a 2-page article in the first place.

Some of the pieces were written 15 years ago, which makes them sound a little stale or irrelevant now, however...With her trademark insight and her special ability to convey the impact public events have on ordinary lives, Quindlen here combines commentary on American society and the world at large with reflections on being a woman, a writer, and a mother.In these pieces, first written for Newsweek and The New York Times, Loud and Clear takes on topics ranging from social change to raising children, from the political and emotional aftermath of September 11 to personal values, from the impact on individuals of global events to the growth that can be gained by spending summer days staring into the middle distance.(The only novel of hers I’ve thought was spectacular is Black and Blue.) She writes very well, thoughtfully and often with humor about everything personal, cultural, political, etc.in such a way that it’s easy for (so many, not just me) to feel as though she’d be a wonderful friend. Russell Ballard quoted from her book in his recent talk "Daughters of God" and in Jane Clayson Johnson book "I am a Mother" she also references a quote from Quindlen. I was expecting a book about life, motivation, mothering & it's okay if you're not perfect.There were several times I needed to grab a dictionary to look up a word she used,in my opinion she is an amazing writer. It made me think, like I have not thought in a long while. It was interesting to hear her views on various things, but I found her tone to be offensively flippant at times and thought that she occasionally oversimplified weighty issues that should probably not be the topic of a 2-page article in the first place.It still surprises me, because of the controversial things she discusses, that she was quoted by either of the people that made me pick the book in the first place, but they did. Some of the pieces were written 15 years ago, which makes I picked this up because I enjoyed Quindlen's novel "One True Thing" so much and assumed that my appreciation for her writing style would easily transfer to this collection of articles.But the first and last columns were the most profound. 11, 2001, her son's birthday, and ends with 9/11, the tragedy, as she prefers to make the distinction between the terminologies so as not to spoil his birthdays from 2001 on.It was worth a listen just to hear her thoughts on that day and it's aftermath. My favorite books are her compilations of columns, such as this one.But3.5Two things I know about Anna Quindlen: She is an opinionated New York liberal / feminist.But she patiently reads us her op-eds with calm and assurance -- occasionally preachy, some might say -- but usually just very heart felt.

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